What is the 6 to 5 Blackjack rule?

Every break-in dealer fresh out of dealing school knows what a blackjack pays. You pay the player three chips for every two he or she wagered when their first two cards are an ace and any ten-value card. The student-dealer also knows that if you can’t figure out the payoff amount on unusual wagers the dealer just breaks the wager in half and cuts into halved chips three times. No sweat, right? But if you’re dealing on one of approximately 231 blackjack tables on the Las Vegas Strip (as of this writing), you would be over paying the customer. Why? Because the house rule dictates that the customer receives an alternative blackjack payoff amount of six chips for every five wagered (6:5). Of the twenty nine major gaming resorts located on the Las Vegas Strip, twenty five casinos offer 6:5 on blackjacks on at least one table, with at least six casino offering 6:5 on between fifteen and twenty five blackjack tables (Wong, 2006). Is the use of a blackjack payout that reduces blackjack payoffs to 6 to 5 increasing the game’s house advantage worth it for the casinos? Should every casino executive consider shifting to the 6:5 rule?

First, let’s look at the purpose of the 6:5 payoff and what it was designed to accomplish for the casino. Several years ago, Howard Grossman created and marketed a variation of traditional blackjack called “Super Fun 21”. Grossman’s desire was to create a blackjack game that was fun and interesting for the player, while providing the casino with a reasonable house advantage on a single deck game. As a past professional player, Grossman knew that casinos that offer a single deck game face a double edged sword; single deck games attracted more play since the customers believe they have a better chance playing against one deck, and the casino’s profit margin was extremely low on single deck games because the basic house advantage is close to breakeven (depending on game rules). By creating a game with different rules that offered different interesting blackjack payoffs while marginally increasing the house advantage of the single deck game, Grossman felt he had the answer to the single deck problem.

Unfortunately for Grossman, one of the major gaming corporations found his variation in blackjack payoffs interesting and decided to offer a blackjack payoff of 6 to 5 instead of Grossman’s payoff schedule, or the standard payoff of 3 to 2 (7.5 to 5). After calculating the difference between the two payoffs, the casino executives discovered their procedure change increased the house’s advantage on the single deck game by an astronomical 1.39%. Knowing that the 6:5 wasn’t part of Grossman’s patented Super Fun 21, some casinos decided to go with the 6:5 rule without incorporating any bonus payoffs or more liberal rules and created an extremely high house advantage games as compared to other traditional blackjack games.

As of this writing, plenty of 6:5 blackjack games populate the Las Vegas Strip. Of the 26 Strip gaming resorts, 22 offer single deck blackjack with the 6:5 rule; 4 locations also offer 6:5 on some of their double deck and six deck games. These locations combine for a total number of 231 blackjack games paying 6:5; almost 16% of all the blackjack games that line Las Vegas Boulevard. If you were to look at blackjack tables in other gaming locations throughout North America you would find an additional 247 games scattered throughout other areas of Las Vegas and Nevada, as well as venues in California, New Mexico, Washington, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi and Atlantic City

Net Entertainment, the world’s leading provider of high-quality online casino games, has paid out 2.9 MEUR after a Swedish player won the massive pooled jackpot when playing on Maria from a bet of just 0.7 Euro cents.

The middle-aged jackpot winner, who lives in Jönköping, Sweden was playing the desktop version of Mega Fortune. Since its release, the game has become hugely popular with players around Europe and currently holds the Guinness World Record for the largest ever jackpot payout in an online slot machine of 17.9 MEUR from January 2013.

The life-changing win is Net Entertainment’s second largest payout in 2014 following a 3.3 MEUR payout to a 50-year-old man from Southern Finland just last month.

Mega Fortune is a progressive pooled jackpot and part of Net Entertainment’s jackpot network, where the liquidity from players from many of the largest European online casinos is pooled. Mega Fortune has made millionaires across Europe since 2008 when it was commercially released to the general market.

Simon Hammon, Chief Product Officer of Net Entertainment, comments: “This has been an astonishing start to the year. Mega Fortune has paid out millions of euros to players and we are delighted that Net Entertainment yet again has proved to the gaming community that regular, life-changing wins occur on our mobile or desktop platforms.”

NEW BRUNSWICK, Canada—One family has struck the jackpot twice in only five months, CBC News reported.

Both wins scooped the lucky family a million dollars each lotto ticket, the report said.

Firstly, the family won a Lotto 6-49 prize in December and then repeated their luck with another win in April 2014, according to the CBC News report.

SACRAMENTO—Two months after a winning $425 million Powerball® ticket was sold in Milpitas, another millionaire has been made in this Northern California city. This time the lucky lottery player won big playing the $2 California Lucky for Life Scratchers game.

Vinayak Pandit uncovered a “LIFE” symbol and won $1,000 a week for 25 years. That’s a grand total of $1.3 million. He’ll now have the option of choosing between weekly payments or the lump sum cash option of $750,000 up front.

Pandit purchased the winning ticket at Victoria Liquors, which is located at 22 S. Park Victoria in Milpitas (Santa Clara County). The owner of the store will receive a retailer bonus of $6,500 just for selling the winning ticket.

The California Lucky for Life Scratchers family of games is part of the Lottery’s continued effort to give out more prizes, create more winners and earn more money for education.

Also, like all Lottery Scratchers games, the California Lucky for Life games come with a second chance to win the top prize. Just subscribe to our 2nd Chance Program and submit any non-winning California Lucky for Life Scratchers ticket code for a chance to win.

SACRAMENTO—This is quite the story. A man bought a $10 California Lucky for Life Scratchers ticket at a convenience store in Delano and it hit big! How big? Well, when it comes to this family of games things couldn’t have gotten any better.

Edgar Cabanban Jr. uncovered a “LIFE” symbol on that ticket. Look at the scanned image of his ticket below. You can see the wording on the second play line. Notice, it also includes his prize amount. That’s right! He scored the game’s top prize -- $5,000 a week for 25 years! Do the math. That amounts to a grand total of $6.5 million. He’ll now get to choose between those weekly payments or the lump sum cash option of $3 million. Either way, this winner is now a multi-millionaire!

Talk about a lucky guy and a lucky retailer. Cabanban purchased that winning ticket at the Fastrip Food Store, which is located at 805 Garces Highway in Delano (Kern County). The owner of the store will receive a retailer bonus of $32,500 just for selling the winning ticket.

The California Lucky for Life Scratchers family of games is part of the Lottery’s continued effort to give out more prizes, create more winners and earn more money for education.

Also, like all Lottery Scratchers games, the California Lucky for Life games come with a second chance to win the top prize. Just subscribe to our 2nd Chance Program and submit any non-winning California Lucky for Life Scratchers ticket code for a chance to win.

GLOUCESTERHIRE, ENGLAND—A residential care home manager has been jailed for eight months for stealing money from “extremely vulnerable” clients to fund her bingo play.

Rachel Stokes, 48, siphoned money from three residents at the home in Gloucestershire over a year-long period after being entrusted with their bank cards and pin numbers because they had learning difficulties.

Stokes, from Dursley in Gloucestershire, England, withdrew up to £400 ($485 U.S.) each month from the clients’ accounts, spending the money on bingo sessions.

Her clients did not notice the thefts, but they were uncovered in an audit by Gloucestershire county council.

Sentencing her at Gloucester crown court, Judge Jamie Tabor QC told Stokes her actions were “the most shocking breach of trust”. He said:

“You looked after some of the most vulnerable people in society, some who could not even speak or articulate their concerns. Over a period of a year you stole from them regularly, apparently to fund a habit that you had.”

Stokes worked as general manager of a care home, which cannot be named to protect her victims.

She admitted three charges of defrauding three vulnerable people in her care, between November 2012 and November 2013.

Speaking after the hearing, a family member of one of her victims said a tougher sentence should have been imposed. “I am not happy, we definitely needed longer,” she said. “There are just no words to describe what she has done.”